My most recent works (the “window” paintings) explore the tensions that are caused by experiencing disjointed spaces within a single painting. Introducing the motif of the window brings complexity into the paintings by disrupting the conventional view of the subject. Further, by making the “frame of view” a subject in itself, the paintings allude to their own presence as an illusionary “window” into an imagined, seen, or remembered visual space. This self-referential quality implicates both the viewer of the work and the wall it hangs on as integral to the experience of looking, and is deeply embedded in the history of painting.

I’m a musician as well as a painter. When I paint, I try to reach a sort of intuitive, “in the moment” creative state that relates to the extemporaneity of jazz. Improvisation is marked by the simultaneous construction of and creative departure from internal melodic structures—I see painting as a parallel visual project. The inherent relativity and subjectivity of perceived colors is integral to this process. I hope to use the interaction of colors within a painting to create a kinetic energy that both works with and transcends the structural limits of its drawing.

I choose to paint because the slow drying time of oil, a six-hundred-year-old medium, encourages me to think and react in a deliberate and thoughtful manner. I am interested in making slow paintings that shift and move, paintings that reveal themselves in time as the viewer’s eye flits across the surface.

Wolf Kahn said that “the greatest sin an artist can be accused of is telling people things that they already know.” I’m guiltier of this than I’d like to admit, but it’s a tendency I’m trying to work against.